Seckou Keita in Salisbury – djembe and dundun weekend 14 & 15 March

Djembe and dundun weekend

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seckou celebrates his 10th year of workshop weekends in Salisbury this year!

Time: 10.30 – 16.30 both days on 14 & 15 March at Wiltshire College, Salisbury

Cost: £40 for one day, or £70 for both

 

“…..he has the ability to raise one’s drumming skills to ever higher levels and his ever-present radiant smile which gets broader when we get it right”

This workshop is not suitable for beginners and inexperienced drummers. You will need to have experience of regular learning of West African rhythms on djembe/dundun, and you must have mastered the basics.

If you are unsure of your level, or to make a booking, please contact coral@drumwhisperer.co.uk

CATRIN SECKOU & AMJ ROCK WOMAD 2014

The Astar family were out in full force this week as WOMAD sold all 40,000 tickets for the first time at Charlton Park.

Catrin & Seckou played a blinder in the early hours of Saturday morning. Don’t take our word for it… here is what the papers said.

“Catrin Finch and Seckou Keita, a collaboration as delightful as it is unlikely. Finch, a Welsh harpist, was lined up a few years ago to play a tour with Malian kora player Toumani Diabaté, and warmed up by rehearsing with his Senegalese counterpart Keita. Diabaté eventually showed up mere hours before the first of those concerts, and though he was there for the tour, Finch felt a closer connection with Keita. They carried on working together and last year released an album of duets, Clychau Dibon, that proved a surprise hit.

Here, the blend of Manding and Welsh material finally stilled the buzz of chatter around the edge of the tent. They listened intently to each other, nodding and smiling as the songs took shape. They duelled playfully on “Future Strings”, Finch plucking ascending chords and running 47-string-long glissandi in a way that is hard for a kora to emulate, though Keita tried; when she knocked rhythms on the frame of her harp, his echo on the gourd of the kora was resonant and strong. The centrepiece of the set, as of the album, was “Robert Ap Huw Meets Nialing Sonko”: in the second half, when Finch took up the dancing Casamance pattern with her right hand, plucking the occasional bass string with her left, the whole tent held its breath.”      Financial Times

“Following Thompson after midnight was the mellifluous award-winning sound of the kora and harp of Seckou Keita and Catrin Finch, as gorgeous as it is on record”   Independent

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